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New hope in the shadow of multiple sclerosis

Georgia Woods saving Alfie's cord blood for MS treatment

Georgia Woods and her baby Alfie

For young mother Georgia Woods, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis shortly after her wedding and is now registered blind after the disease claimed her optic nerves, saving her babies’ cord blood was an easy decision to make. Her hope is that the umbilical cord blood could protect her sons from the condition and that it may even be used to cure her.

Talking to The Standard newspaper in February 2016, Georgia said: “Nobody really knows what stem cells can do for MS, Maybe in the future something is going to come along and I will be able to have a cure. It gives you that little bit of hope. Hope is a great thing – it gets you out of bed.”

It looks as if Georgia’s hopes may be realised. A study in Sheffield, England, recently reported that some MS patients have been able to walk again after receiving stem cell transplants

Multiple sclerosis is a progressive disease that involves damage to the myelin sheaths of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. MS sufferers experience a wide range of problems including fatigue, bladder and bowel problems, sexual problems, pain, depression, muscular, hearing and vision changes.

Cord blood stem cells have the potential to repair or replace cells. By banking their cord blood, Georgia has  given her sons access to their own personal “repair kit” – to use now and into the future.

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